Back to Home Page
Artists Community Send us Info
Membership Frequently Asked Questions About Us Search
Georg Dietzler, "Self-Decomposing Laboratory"
Georg Dietzler, "Self-Decomposing Laboratory", interior detail, Aachen, Germany, 1999

Georg Dietzler, "Self-Decomposing Laboratory", doorway view   Georg Dietzler, "Self-Decomposing Laboratory", doorway view, Aachen, Germany, 1999
Georg Dietzler, "Self-Decomposing Laboratory", front view   Georg Dietzler, "Self-Decomposing Laboratory", front view, Aachen, Germany, 1999
Georg Dietzler, "Self-Decomposing Laboratory", in progress,   Georg Dietzler, "Self-Decomposing Laboratory", in progress, Aachen, Germany, 1999
Georg Dietzler, "Self-Decomposing Laboratory", side view   Georg Dietzler, "Self-Decomposing Laboratory", side view, Aachen, Germany, 1999
Georg Dietzler, "Self-Decomposing Laboratory", interior shelves   Georg Dietzler, "Self-Decomposing Laboratory", interior shelves, Aachen, Germany, 1999
Georg Dietzler

Self Decomposing Laboratory

Straw bale, poplar wood constuction and shelves, PCB contaminated soil, oyster-mushroom cultures, moisture contol unit, information board about soil analysis, 10x10x12 feet, plastered surface

Aachen, Germany

Oystermushroom cultures inocculated in PCB-contaminated soil (Mixed with growing media of woodchips, straw & potatoes) will split off the chemical structure of PCB into non-toxic substances in a period of about 18 months. Depending on climatic conditions the mushrooms have regenerated the laboratory unit and adapted to its surroundings in between five to ten years. The laboratory has been constructed which allows visitors visual access only. Environmental agency scientists doing soil analyses have access only, their results and microscope photographs will be presented on an information board while the process of decontamination is invisible. Description on Natural Reality website

© 2010 greenmuseum.org